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2017


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A Wrist-Squeezing Force-Feedback System for Robotic Surgery Training

Brown, J. D., Fernandez, J. N., Cohen, S. P., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 107-112, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Over time, surgical trainees learn to compensate for the lack of haptic feedback in commercial robotic minimally invasive surgical systems. Incorporating touch cues into robotic surgery training could potentially shorten this learning process if the benefits of haptic feedback were sustained after it is removed. In this paper, we develop a wrist-squeezing haptic feedback system and evaluate whether it holds the potential to train novice da Vinci users to reduce the force they exert on a bimanual inanimate training task. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups according to a multiple baseline experimental design. Each of the ten participants moved a ring along a curved wire nine times while the haptic feedback was conditionally withheld, provided, and withheld again. The realtime tactile feedback of applied force magnitude significantly reduced the integral of the force produced by the da Vinci tools on the task materials, and this result remained even when the haptic feedback was removed. Overall, our findings suggest that wrist-squeezing force feedback can play an essential role in helping novice trainees learn to minimize the force they exert with a surgical robot.

DOI [BibTex]

2017

DOI [BibTex]


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Handling Scan-Time Parameters in Haptic Surface Classification

Burka, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 424-429, Munich, Germany, June 2017 (inproceedings)

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Proton Pack: Visuo-Haptic Surface Data Recording

Burka, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), Munich, Germany, June 2017 (misc)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Teaching a Robot to Collaborate with a Human Via Haptic Teleoperation

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Work-in-progress paper (2 pages) presented at the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), Munich, Germany, June 2017 (misc)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


How Should Robots Hug?
How Should Robots Hug?

Block, A. E., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Work-in-progress paper (2 pages) presented at the IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), Munich, Germany, June 2017 (misc)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Evaluation of a Vibrotactile Simulator for Dental Caries Detection

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Parajon, R., Maggio, M. P.

Simulation in Healthcare, 12(3):148-156, June 2017 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Proton 2: Increasing the Sensitivity and Portability of a Visuo-haptic Surface Interaction Recorder

Burka, A., Rajvanshi, A., Allen, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), pages: 439-445, Singapore, May 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Portable Robotic Optical/Tactile ObservatioN PACKage (PROTONPACK, or Proton for short) is a new handheld visuo-haptic sensing system that records surface interactions. We previously demonstrated system calibration and a classification task using external motion tracking. This paper details improvements in surface classification performance and removal of the dependence on external motion tracking, necessary before embarking on our goal of gathering a vast surface interaction dataset. Two experiments were performed to refine data collection parameters. After adjusting the placement and filtering of the Proton's high-bandwidth accelerometers, we recorded interactions between two differently-sized steel tooling ball end-effectors (diameter 6.35 and 9.525 mm) and five surfaces. Using features based on normal force, tangential force, end-effector speed, and contact vibration, we trained multi-class SVMs to classify the surfaces using 50 ms chunks of data from each end-effector. Classification accuracies of 84.5% and 91.5% respectively were achieved on unseen test data, an improvement over prior results. In parallel, we pursued on-board motion tracking, using the Proton's camera and fiducial markers. Motion tracks from the external and onboard trackers agree within 2 mm and 0.01 rad RMS, and the accuracy decreases only slightly to 87.7% when using onboard tracking for the 9.525 mm end-effector. These experiments indicate that the Proton 2 is ready for portable data collection.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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An Interactive Augmented-Reality Video Training Platform for the da Vinci Surgical System

Carlson, J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Workshop paper (3 pages) presented at the ICRA Workshop on C4 Surgical Robots, Singapore, May 2017 (misc)

Abstract
Teleoperated surgical robots such as the Intuitive da Vinci Surgical System facilitate minimally invasive surgeries, which decrease risk to patients. However, these systems can be difficult to learn, and existing training curricula on surgical simulators do not offer students the realistic experience of a full operation. This paper presents an augmented-reality video training platform for the da Vinci that will allow trainees to rehearse any surgery recorded by an expert. While the trainee operates a da Vinci in free space, they see their own instruments overlaid on the expert video. Tools are identified in the source videos via color segmentation and kernelized correlation filter tracking, and their depth is calculated from the da Vinci’s stereoscopic video feed. The user tries to follow the expert’s movements, and if any of their tools venture too far away, the system provides instantaneous visual feedback and pauses to allow the user to correct their motion. The trainee can also rewind the expert video by bringing either da Vinci tool very close to the camera. This combined and augmented video provides the user with an immersive and interactive training experience.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients
Robot Therapist for Assisting in At-Home Rehabilitation of Shoulder Surgery Patients

(Recipient of Innovation & Entrepreneurship Prize)

Burns, R., Alborz, M., Chalup, Z., Downen, S., Genuino, K., Nayback, C., Nesbitt, N., Park, C. H.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The number of middle-aged to elderly patients receiving shoulder surgery is increasing. However, statistically, very few of these patients perform the necessary at-home physical therapy regimen they are prescribed post-surgery. This results in longer recovery times and/or incomplete healing. We propose the use of a robotic therapist, with customized training and encouragement regimens, to increase physical therapy adherence and improve the patient’s recovery experience.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Motion Learning for Emotional Interaction and Imitation of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

(First place tie in category, "Biomedical Engineering, Graduate Research")

Burns, R., Cowin, S.

In 2017 GW Research Days, Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations, April 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We aim to use motion learning to teach a robot to imitate people's unique gestures. Our robot, ROBOTIS-OP2, can ultimately use imitation to practice social skills with children with autism. In this abstract, two methods of motion learning were compared: Dynamic motion primitives with least squares (DMP with WLS), and Dynamic motion primitives with a Gaussian Mixture Regression (DMP with GMR). Movements with sharp turns were most accurately reproduced using DMP with GMR. Additionally, more states are required to accurately recreate more complex gestures.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Hand-Clapping Games with a Baxter Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), Vienna, Austria, March 2017 (misc)

Abstract
Robots that work alongside humans might be more effective if they could forge a strong social bond with their human partners. Hand-clapping games and other forms of rhythmic social-physical interaction may foster human-robot teamwork, but the design of such interactions has scarcely been explored. At the HRI 2017 conference, we will showcase several such interactions taken from our recent work with the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot, including tempo-matching, Simon says, and Pat-a-cake-like games. We believe conference attendees will be both entertained and intrigued by this novel demonstration of social-physical HRI.

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Automatic OSATS Rating of Trainee Skill at a Pediatric Laparoscopic Suturing Task

Oquendo, Y. A., Riddle, E. W., Hiller, D., Blinman, T. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 31(Supplement 1):S28, Extended abstract presented as a podium presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES), Springer, Houston, USA, March 2017 (misc)

Abstract
Introduction: Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized surgical practice, but challenges remain. Trainees must acquire complex technical skills while minimizing patient risk, and surgeons must maintain their skills for rare procedures. These challenges are magnified in pediatric surgery due to the smaller spaces, finer tissue, and relative dearth of both inanimate and virtual simulators. To build technical expertise, trainees need opportunities for deliberate practice with specific performance feedback, which is typically provided via tedious human grading. This study aimed to validate a novel motion-tracking system and machine learning algorithm for automatically evaluating trainee performance on a pediatric laparoscopic suturing task using a 1–5 OSATS Overall Skill rating. Methods: Subjects (n=14) ranging from medical students to fellows per- formed one or two trials of an intracorporeal suturing task in a custom pediatric laparoscopy training box (Fig. 1) after watching a video of ideal performance by an expert. The position and orientation of the tools and endoscope were recorded over time using Ascension trakSTAR magnetic motion-tracking sensors, and both instrument grasp angles were recorded over time using flex sensors on the handles. The 27 trials were video-recorded and scored on the OSATS scale by a senior fellow; ratings ranged from 1 to 4. The raw motion data from each trial was processed to calculate over 200 preliminary motion parameters. Regularized least-squares regression (LASSO) was used to identify the most predictive parameters for inclusion in a regression tree. Model performance was evaluated by leave-one-subject-out cross validation, wherein the automatic scores given to each subject’s trials (by a model trained on all other data) are compared to the corresponding human rater scores. Results: The best-performing LASSO algorithm identified 14 predictive parameters for inclusion in the regression tree, including completion time, linear path length, angular path length, angular acceleration, grasp velocity, and grasp acceleration. The final model’s raw output showed a strong positive correlation of 0.87 with the reviewer-generated scores, and rounding the output to the nearest integer yielded a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation accuracy of 77.8%. Results are summarized in the confusion matrix (Table 1). Conclusions: Our novel motion-tracking system and regression model automatically gave previously unseen trials overall skill scores that closely match scores from an expert human rater. With additional data and further development, this system may enable creation of a motion-based training platform for pediatric laparoscopic surgery and could yield insights into the fundamental components of surgical skill.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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How Much Haptic Surface Data is Enough?

Burka, A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Workshop paper (5 pages) presented at the AAAI Spring Symposium on Interactive Multi-Sensory Object Perception for Embodied Agents, Stanford, USA, March 2017 (misc)

Abstract
The Proton Pack is a portable visuo-haptic surface interaction recording device that will be used to collect a vast multimodal dataset, intended for robots to use as part of an approach to understanding the world around them. In order to collect a useful dataset, we want to pick a suitable interaction duration for each surface, noting the tradeoff between data collection resources and completeness of data. One interesting approach frames the data collection process as an online learning problem, building an incremental surface model and using that model to decide when there is enough data. Here we examine how to do such online surface modeling and when to stop collecting data, using kinetic friction as a first domain in which to apply online modeling.

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Importance of Matching Physical Friction, Hardness, and Texture in Creating Realistic Haptic Virtual Surfaces

Culbertson, H., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 10(1):63-74, January 2017 (article)

[BibTex]


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Effects of Grip-Force, Contact, and Acceleration Feedback on a Teleoperated Pick-and-Place Task

Khurshid, R. P., Fitter, N. T., Fedalei, E. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 10(1):40-53, January 2017 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Enhancing Human-Computer Interaction via Electrovibration
Enhancing Human-Computer Interaction via Electrovibration

Emgin, S. E., Sadia, B., Vardar, Y., Basdogan, C.

Demo in IEEE World Haptics, 2017 (misc)

Abstract
We present a compact tablet that displays electrostatic haptic feedback to the user. We track user?s finger position via an infrared frame and then display haptic feedback through a capacitive touch screen based on her/his position. In order to demonstrate practical utility of the proposed system, the following applications have been developed: (1) Online Shopping application allows users to be able to feel the cord density of two different fabrics. (2) Education application asks user to add two numbers by dragging one number onto another in order to match the sum. After selecting the first number, haptic feedback assists user to select the right pair. (3) Gaming/Entertainment application presents users a bike riding experience on three different road textures -smooth, bumpy, and sandy. (4) User Interface application in which users are asked to drag two visually identical folders. While dragging, users are able to differentiate the amount of data in each folder based on haptic resistance.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens
Roughness perception of virtual textures displayed by electrovibration on touch screens

Vardar, Y., Isleyen, A., Saleem, M. K., Basdogan, C.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 263-268, 2017 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this study, we have investigated the human roughness perception of periodical textures on an electrostatic display by conducting psychophysical experiments with 10 subjects. To generate virtual textures, we used low frequency unipolar pulse waves in different waveform (sinusoidal, square, saw-tooth, triangle), and spacing. We modulated these waves with a 3kHz high frequency sinusoidal carrier signal to minimize perceptional differences due to the electrical filtering of human finger and eliminate low-frequency distortions. The subjects were asked to rate 40 different macro textures on a Likert scale of 1-7. We also collected the normal and tangential forces acting on the fingers of subjects during the experiment. The results of our user study showed that subjects perceived the square wave as the roughest while they perceived the other waveforms equally rough. The perceived roughness followed an inverted U-shaped curve as a function of groove width, but the peak point shifted to the left compared to the results of the earlier studies. Moreover, we found that the roughness perception of subjects is best correlated with the rate of change of the contact forces rather than themselves.

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]

vardar_whc2017 DOI [BibTex]


Reproduction of textures based on electrovibration
Reproduction of textures based on electrovibration

Fiedler, T., Vardar, Y., Strese, M., Steinbach, E., Basdogan, C.

Demo in IEEE World Haptics, 2017 (misc)

Abstract
This demonstration presents an approach to represent textures based on electovibration. We collect acceleration data which occurs while sliding a tool tip over a real texture surface. The prerecorded data was collected by a ADXL335 accelerometer, which is mounted on a FALCON device moving on the x-axis with a regulated velocity. In order to replicate the same acceleration with electrovibration, we found two problems. The frequency of one sine wave shifts to the double frequency. This effect originates from the electrostatic force between the finger pad and the tactile display as proposed by Kactmarek et Al. [1]. Taking the square root of the input signal corrects the effect. This was also earlier proposed by [1, 2, 3] However, if not only one but multiple sine waves are displayed interference occur and acceleration signals from real textures may not feel perceptually realistic. We propose to display only the dominant frequencies from a real texture signal. Peak frequencies are determined within the respect of the JND of 11 percent found by earlier literature. A new sine wave signal with the dominant frequencies is created. In the demo, we will let the attendees feel the differences between prerecorded and artificially created textures.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The tactile perception of transient changes in friction

Gueorguiev, D., Vezzoli, E., Mouraux, A., Lemaire-Semail, B., Thonnard, J.

Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 14(137), The Royal Society, 2017 (article)

Abstract
When we touch an object or explore a texture, frictional strains are induced by the tactile interactions with the surface of the object. Little is known about how these interactions are perceived, although it becomes crucial for the nascent industry of interactive displays with haptic feedback (e.g. smartphones and tablets) where tactile feedback based on friction modulation is particularly relevant. To investigate the human perception of frictional strains, we mounted a high-fidelity friction modulating ultrasonic device on a robotic platform performing controlled rubbing of the fingertip and asked participants to detect induced decreases of friction during a forced-choice task. The ability to perceive the changes in friction was found to follow Weber{\textquoteright}s Law of just noticeable differences, as it consistently depended on the ratio between the reduction in tangential force and the pre-stimulation tangential force. The Weber fraction was 0.11 in all conditions demonstrating a very high sensitivity to transient changes in friction. Humid fingers experienced less friction reduction than drier ones for the same intensity of ultrasonic vibration but the Weber fraction for detecting changes in friction was not influenced by the humidity of the skin.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Effect of Waveform on Tactile Perception by Electrovibration Displayed on Touch Screens
Effect of Waveform on Tactile Perception by Electrovibration Displayed on Touch Screens

Vardar, Y., Güçlü, B., Basdogan, C.

IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 10(4):488-499, 2017 (article)

Abstract
In this study, we investigated the effect of input voltage waveform on our haptic perception of electrovibration on touch screens. Through psychophysical experiments performed with eight subjects, we first measured the detection thresholds of electrovibration stimuli generated by sinusoidal and square voltages at various fundamental frequencies. We observed that the subjects were more sensitive to stimuli generated by square wave voltage than sinusoidal one for frequencies lower than 60 Hz. Using Matlab simulations, we showed that the sensation difference of waveforms in low fundamental frequencies occurred due to the frequency-dependent electrical properties of human skin and human tactile sensitivity. To validate our simulations, we conducted a second experiment with another group of eight subjects. We first actuated the touch screen at the threshold voltages estimated in the first experiment and then measured the contact force and acceleration acting on the index fingers of the subjects moving on the screen with a constant speed. We analyzed the collected data in the frequency domain using the human vibrotactile sensitivity curve. The results suggested that Pacinian channel was the primary psychophysical channel in the detection of the electrovibration stimuli caused by all the square-wave inputs tested in this study. We also observed that the measured force and acceleration data were affected by finger speed in a complex manner suggesting that it may also affect our haptic perception accordingly.

vardar_toh2017 DOI [BibTex]

vardar_toh2017 DOI [BibTex]


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Feeling multiple edges: The tactile perception of short ultrasonic square reductions of the finger-surface friction

Gueorguiev, D., Vezzoli, E., Sednaoui, T., Grisoni, L., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In 2017 IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), pages: 125-129, 2017 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2016


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Qualitative User Reactions to a Hand-Clapping Humanoid Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 317-327, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

2016

[BibTex]


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Designing and Assessing Expressive Open-Source Faces for the Baxter Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 340-350, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Rhythmic Timing in Playful Human-Robot Social Motor Coordination

Fitter, N. T., Hawkes, D. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Social Robotics: 8th International Conference, ICSR 2016, Kansas City, MO, USA, November 1-3, 2016 Proceedings, 9979, pages: 296-305, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer International Publishing, November 2016, Oral presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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An electro-active polymer based lens module for dynamically varying focal system

Yun, S., Park, S., Nam, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Mun, S., Lim, J. M., Kyung, K.

Applied Physics Letters, 109(14):141908, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
We demonstrate a polymer-based active-lens module allowing a dynamic focus controllable optical system with a wide tunable range. The active-lens module is composed of parallelized two active- lenses with a convex and a concave shaped hemispherical lens structure, respectively. Under opera- tion with dynamic input voltage signals, each active-lens produces translational movement bi-directionally responding to a hybrid driving force that is a combination of an electro-active response of a thin dielectric elastomer membrane and an electro-static attraction force. Since the proposed active lens module widely modulates a gap-distance between lens-elements, an optical system based on the active-lens module provides widely-variable focusing for selective imaging of objects in arbitrary position.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Quantifying Therapist Practitioner Roles Using Video-based Analysis: Can We Reliably Model Therapist-Patient Interactions During Task-Oriented Therapy?

Mendonca, R., Johnson, M. J., Laskin, S., Adair, L., Mohan, M.

pages: E55-E56, Abstract in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, October 2016 (misc)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Using IMU Data to Demonstrate Hand-Clapping Games to a Robot

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 851 - 856, October 2016, Interactive presentation given by Fitter (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Wrinkle structures formed by formulating UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers

Park, S. K., Kwark, Y., Nam, S., Park, S., Park, B., Yun, S., Moon, J., Lee, J., Yu, B., Kyung, K.

Polymer, 99, pages: 447-452, September 2016 (article)

Abstract
Artificial wrinkles have recently been in the spotlight due to their potential use in high-tech applications. A spontaneously wrinkled film can be fabricated from UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers. Here, we controlled the wrinkle formation by simply formulating two UV-crosslinkable liquid prepolymers, tetraethylene glycol bis(4-ethenyl-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl) ether (TEGDSt) and tetraethylene glycol diacrylate (TEGDA). The wrinkles were formed from the TEGDSt/TEGDA formulated prepolymer layers containing up to 30 wt% of TEGDA. The wrinkle formation depended upon the rate of photo-crosslinking reaction of the formulated prepolymers. The first order apparent rate constant, kapp, was between ca. 5.7 × 10−3 and 12.2 × 10−3 s−1 for the wrinkle formation. The wrinkle structures were modulated within the kapp mainly due to variation in the extent of shrinkage of the formulated prepolymer layers with the content of TEGDA

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Numerical Investigation of Frictional Forces Between a Finger and a Textured Surface During Active Touch

Khojasteh, B., Janko, M., Visell, Y.

Extended abstract presented in form of an oral presentation at the 3rd International Conference on BioTribology (ICoBT), London, England, September 2016 (misc)

Abstract
The biomechanics of the human finger pad has been investigated in relation to motor behaviour and sensory function in the upper limb. While the frictional properties of the finger pad are important for grip and grasp function, recent attention has also been given to the roles played by friction when perceiving a surface via sliding contact. Indeed, the mechanics of sliding contact greatly affect stimuli felt by the finger scanning a surface. Past research has shed light on neural mechanisms of haptic texture perception, but the relation with time-resolved frictional contact interactions is unknown. Current biotribological models cannot predict time-resolved frictional forces felt by a finger as it slides on a rough surface. This constitutes a missing link in understanding the mechanical basis of texture perception. To ameliorate this, we developed a two-dimensional finite element numerical simulation of a human finger pad in sliding contact with a textured surface. Our model captures bulk mechanical properties, including hyperelasticity, dissipation, and tissue heterogeneity, and contact dynamics. To validate it, we utilized a database of measurements that we previously captured with a variety of human fingers and surfaces. By designing the simulations to match the measurements, we evaluated the ability of the FEM model to predict time-resolved sliding frictional forces. We varied surface texture wavelength, sliding speed, and normal forces in the experiments. An analysis of the results indicated that both time- and frequency-domain features of forces produced during finger-surface sliding interactions were reproduced, including many of the phenomena that we observed in analyses of real measurements, including quasiperiodicity, harmonic distortion and spectral decay in the frequency domain, and their dependence on kinetics and surface properties. The results shed light on frictional signatures of surface texture during active touch, and may inform understanding of the role played by friction in texture discrimination.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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ProtonPack: A Visuo-Haptic Data Acquisition System for Robotic Learning of Surface Properties

Burka, A., Hu, S., Helgeson, S., Krishnan, S., Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Multisensor Fusion and Integration for Intelligent Systems (MFI), pages: 58-65, 2016, Oral presentation given by Burka (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Equipping the Baxter Robot with Human-Inspired Hand-Clapping Skills

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), pages: 105-112, 2016 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Comparison of vibro-acoustic performance metrics in the design and optimization of stiffened composite fuselages

Serhat, G., Basdogan, I.

In Proceedings of International Congress and Exposition of Noise Control Engineering (INTER-NOISE), Hamburg, Germany, August 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, a comparison of preliminary design methodologies for optimization of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite fuselages for vibro-acoustic requirements is presented. Fuselage stiffness properties are modelled using lamination parameters and their effect on the vibro-acoustic performance is investigated using two different approaches. First method, only considers the structural model in order to explore the effect of design variables on fuselage vibrations. The simplified estimation of the acoustic behavior without considering fluid-structure interaction brings certain advantages such as reduced modelling effort and computational cost. In this case, the performance metric is chosen as equivalent radiated power (ERP) which is a well-known criterion in the prediction of structure-born noise. Second method, utilizes coupled vibro-acoustic models to predict the sound pressure levels (SPL) inside the fuselage. ERP is calculated both for bay panels and fuselage section and then compared with the SPL results. The response surfaces of each metric are determined as a function of lamination parameters and their overall difference is quantified. ERP approach proves its merit provided that a sufficiently accurate model is used. The results demonstrate the importance of the simplifications made in the modelling and the selection of analysis approach in vibro-acoustic design of fuselages.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Behavioral Learning and Imitation for Music-Based Robotic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Behavioral Learning and Imitation for Music-Based Robotic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Burns, R., Nizambad, S., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Workshop paper (5 pages) at the RO-MAN Workshop on Behavior Adaptation, Interaction and Learning for Assistive Robotics, August 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this full workshop paper, we discuss the positive impacts of robot, music, and imitation therapies on children with autism. We also discuss the use of Laban Motion Analysis (LMA) to identify emotion through movement and posture cues. We present our preliminary studies of the "Five Senses" game that our two robots, Romo the penguin and Darwin Mini, partake in. Using an LMA-focused approach (enabled by our skeletal tracking Kinect algorithm), we find that our participants show increased frequency of movement and speed when the game has a musical accompaniment. Therefore, participants may have increased engagement with our robots and game if music is present. We also begin exploring motion learning for future works.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Reproducing a Laser Pointer Dot on a Secondary Projected Screen

Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), pages: 1645-1650, 2016, Oral presentation given by Hu (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Effect of Aspect Ratio and Boundary Conditions on the Eigenfrequency Optimization of Composite Panels Using Lamination Parameters

Serhat, G., Basdogan, I.

In Proceedings of the ASMO UK International Conference on Numerical Optimisation Methods for Engineering Design, pages: 160–168, Munich, Germany, July 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Eigenfrequency optimization of laminated composite panels is a common engineering problem. This process mostly involves designing stiffness properties of the structure. Optimal results can differ significantly depending on the values of the model parameters and the metrics used for the optimization. Building the know-how on this matter is crucial for choosing the appropriate design methodologies as well as validation and justification of prospective results. In this paper, effects of aspect ratio and boundary conditions on eigenfrequency optimization of composite panels by altering stiffness properties are investigated. Lamination parameters are chosen as design variables which are used in the modeling of stiffness tensors. This technique enables representation of overall stiffness characteristics and provides a convex design space. Fundamental frequency and difference between fundamental and second natural frequencies are maximized as design objectives. Optimization studies incorporating different models and responses are performed. Optimal lamination parameters and response values are provided for each case and the effects of model parameters on the solutions are quantified. The results indicate that trends of the optima change for different aspect ratio ranges and boundary conditions. Moreover, convergence occurs beyond certain critical values of the model parameters which may cause an optimization study to be redundant.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design and evaluation of a novel mechanical device to improve hemiparetic gait: a case report

Fjeld, K., Hu, S., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Vasudevan, E. V.

Extended abstract presented at the Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement Conference (BANCOM), 2016, Poster presentation given by Fjeld (misc)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Multi-objective optimization of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite fuselages for mechanical and vibro-acoustic requirements

Serhat, G., Faria, T. G., Basdogan, I.

In Proceedings of AIAA/ISSMO Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization Conference, Washington, USA, June 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, a preliminary design methodology for optimization of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite fuselages for combined mechanical and vibro-acoustic requirements is presented. Laminate stiffness distributions are represented using the method called lamination parameters which is known to provide a convex solution space. Single-objective and multi-objective optimization studies are carried out in order to find optimal stiffness distributions. Performance metrics for acoustical behavior are chosen as maximum fundamental frequency and minimum equivalent radiated power. The mechanical performance metric is chosen as the maximum stiffness. The results show that the presented methodology works effectively and it can be used to improve load-carrying and acoustical performances simultaneously.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Deep Learning for Tactile Understanding From Visual and Haptic Data

Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Kuchenbecker, K. J., Darrell, T.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 536-543, May 2016, Oral presentation given by Gao (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robust Tactile Perception of Artificial Tumors Using Pairwise Comparisons of Sensor Array Readings

Hui, J. C. T., Block, A. E., Taylor, C. J., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 305-312, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016, Oral presentation given by Hui (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Data-Driven Comparison of Four Cutaneous Displays for Pinching Palpation in Robotic Surgery

Brown, J. D., Ibrahim, M., Chase, E. D. Z., Pacchierotti, C., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 147-154, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016, Oral presentation given by Brown (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Multisensory Robotic Therapy through Motion Capture and Imitation for Children with ASD
Multisensory Robotic Therapy through Motion Capture and Imitation for Children with ASD

Burns, R., Nizambad, S., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education, Mid-Atlantic Section, Spring Conference, April 2016 (conference)

Abstract
It is known that children with autism have difficulty with emotional communication. As the population of children with autism increases, it is crucial we create effective therapeutic programs that will improve their communication skills. We present an interactive robotic system that delivers emotional and social behaviors for multi­sensory therapy for children with autism spectrum disorders. Our framework includes emotion­-based robotic gestures and facial expressions, as well as tracking and understanding the child’s responses through Kinect motion capture.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Design and Implementation of a Visuo-Haptic Data Acquisition System for Robotic Learning of Surface Properties

Burka, A., Hu, S., Helgeson, S., Krishnan, S., Gao, Y., Hendricks, L. A., Darrell, T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE Haptics Symposium, pages: 350-352, April 2016, Work-in-progress paper. Poster presentation given by Burka (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Objective assessment of robotic surgical skill using instrument contact vibrations

Gomez, E. D., Aggarwal, R., McMahan, W., Bark, K., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Surgical Endoscopy, 30(4):1419-1431, 2016 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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One Sensor, Three Displays: A Comparison of Tactile Rendering from a BioTac Sensor

Brown, J. D., Ibrahim, M., Chase, E. D. Z., Pacchierotti, C., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Hands-on demonstration presented at IEEE Haptics Symposium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, April 2016 (misc)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Multisensory robotic therapy to promote natural emotional interaction for children with ASD
Multisensory robotic therapy to promote natural emotional interaction for children with ASD

Bevill, R., Azzi, P., Spadafora, M., Park, C. H., Jeon, M., Kim, H. J., Lee, J., Raihan, K., Howard, A.

Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction (HRI), pages: 571, March 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this video submission, we are introduced to two robots, Romo the penguin and Darwin Mini. We have programmed these robots to perform a variety of emotions through facial expression and body language, respectively. We aim to use these robots with children with autism, to demo safe emotional and social responses in various sensory situations.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Interactive Robotic Framework for Multi-Sensory Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Interactive Robotic Framework for Multi-Sensory Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Bevill, R., Park, C. H., Kim, H. J., Lee, J., Rennie, A., Jeon, M., Howard, A.

Extended abstract presented at the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction (HRI), March 2016 (misc)

Abstract
In this abstract, we present the overarching goal of our interactive robotic framework - to teach emotional and social behavior to children with autism spectrum disorders via multi-sensory therapy. We introduce our robot characters, Romo and Darwin Mini, and the "Five Senses" scenario they will undergo. This sensory game will develop the children's interest, and will model safe and appropriate reactions to typical sensory overload stimuli.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Cutaneous Feedback of Fingertip Deformation and Vibration for Palpation in Robotic Surgery

Pacchierotti, C., Prattichizzo, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 63(2):278-287, February 2016 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control

Nam, S., Park, S., Yun, S., Park, B., Park, S. K., Kyung, K.

Optics Express, 24(1):55-66, OSA, January 2016 (article)

Abstract
We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Psychophysical Power Optimization of Friction Modulation for Tactile Interfaces

Sednaoui, T., Vezzoli, E., Gueorguiev, D., Amberg, M., Chappaz, C., Lemaire-Semail, B.

In Haptics: Perception, Devices, Control, and Applications, pages: 354-362, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Ultrasonic vibration and electrovibration can modulate the friction between a surface and a sliding finger. The power consumption of these devices is critical to their integration in modern mobile devices such as smartphones. This paper presents a simple control solution to reduce up to 68.8 {\%} this power consumption by taking advantage of the human perception limits.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Effect of Waveform in Haptic Perception of Electrovibration on Touchscreens
Effect of Waveform in Haptic Perception of Electrovibration on Touchscreens

Vardar, Y., Güçlü, B., Basdogan, C.

In Haptics: Perception, Devices, Control, and Applications, pages: 190-203, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2016 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The perceived intensity of electrovibration can be altered by modulating the amplitude, frequency, and waveform of the input voltage signal applied to the conductive layer of a touchscreen. Even though the effect of the first two has been already investigated for sinusoidal signals, we are not aware of any detailed study investigating the effect of the waveform on our haptic perception in the domain of electrovibration. This paper investigates how input voltage waveform affects our haptic perception of electrovibration on touchscreens. We conducted absolute detection experiments using square wave and sinusoidal input signals at seven fundamental frequencies (15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 and 1920 Hz). Experimental results depicted the well-known U-shaped tactile sensitivity across frequencies. However, the sensory thresholds were lower for the square wave than the sinusoidal wave at fundamental frequencies less than 60 Hz while they were similar at higher frequencies. Using an equivalent circuit model of a finger-touchscreen system, we show that the sensation difference between the waveforms at low fundamental frequencies can be explained by frequency-dependent electrical properties of human skin and the differential sensitivity of mechanoreceptor channels to individual frequency components in the electrostatic force. As a matter of fact, when the electrostatic force waveforms are analyzed in the frequency domain based on human vibrotactile sensitivity data from the literature [15], the electrovibration stimuli caused by square-wave input signals at all the tested frequencies in this study are found to be detected by the Pacinian psychophysical channel.

vardar_eurohaptics_2016 [BibTex]

vardar_eurohaptics_2016 [BibTex]